Pages

Search This Blog

03 March 2013

The individual

Clutch from the markets in Marrakesh, can't find that in Zara.

I was in Zara the other day and I picked up some shoes and a pair of shorts and took them home (after paying, people who steal get herpes kids, don't do it) and felt a sudden wave of nostalgia reviewing the days purchases. I didn't recall wearing oragami like shorts or any kind of heel (apart from the pink glitter jelly variety) as a child, so it didn't take long for me to twig this recognition came from somewhere other than my pre-adolescence. In fact, the pieces were oh so very Celine. I say 'oh so very' because they were not identical to any pieces produced by Celine or any show that I myself recalled seeing, but Zara had definitely figuratively jacked some swag from Celine, and a little Miss Stella McCartney too.

This issue has become quite the debate among. The high street supporters say 'yay' and the designer lovers typically say 'nay'. I say 'yanay'. Honestly, I'm confused people, oh so very confused. On the one hand, I think it's somewhat unfair that Zara (the shop that does seem to be at the heart of the issue) should essentially steal ideas created by designers, but on the other hand, I'm 16 and I can't afford Celine or Stella or Marant, heck I can't even afford my lunch most of the time. When Suzy Menkes posted her article, one of the most out-spoken opinions was that she didn't want fashion to be accessible and that was unfair. If we condemn the likes of Zara and Topshop for taking inspiration from designers, are we not closing off certain trends from the everyday consumer? I may see a vibe at Marant that I love, I like to think that one day I will be able to invest in long-standing, designer peices but right now that isn't plausible and thus should I have to sigh and watch that idea pass me by. If that became the case at every show, then I must admit Fashion Week may become a slightly more depressing 'look, don't touch...ever' event. Half the fun of fashion is that you get to wear it. Whether it be £1000 or £10. People may stand up and say it's wrong for the high street to eminate another persons ideas, but is that not what we expect from the high street on some level? It seems they're stuck between a rock and a hard place most of the time. Someone may love a pair of Kenzo boots but realistically those aren't attainable for everyone, when H&M creates a similar pair, they're targeting that person. Perhaps it could be argued that if you want the real thing, don't buy the copy, if you don't mind an interpretation, go for it. I think what is admirable is when these shops succesfully transform an idea presented by someone else into their own adaptation. To give Zara credit on the issue, they do have a lot of original designs too.
I've also noticed people don't seem to get nearly as much retaliation when they DIY a designers piece, often they're applauded, what is the difference? Is there one?

Finally it occurred to me that perhaps we read too deeply into what we see on the high street, Dries van Noten did oriental printed silk, so did Zara...but Oriental is a key trend this season, why shouldn't Zara give it a shot? If you look really closely, the pieces are similar, but so are collections presented by designers in some cases if you stare at them for a while. Maybe if you stared at me and my cat long enough we might be able to look somewhat similar (lol jk, we're identical twins). No particular designer has ownership over a trend, in some ways they serve a function to all levels of fashion by providing the original idea.
Looking back at those Zara shorts and heels I bought, perhaps they emulate minimalism and as well as Celine may present that idea, it doesn't own it.

bloglovin' | twitter | facebook 

28 comments:

  1. Great blog post! I love your new style of blogging :) I don't think any design can ever be thought of as truly 'original' as there has always been some sort of similar trend in the past, so it's unfair of the designers to say Zara are copying! I love Zara and hope they will continue to make designer style pieces. I also love your new clutch, it's gorgeous! x

    ReplyDelete
  2. true....can't find it in zara!



    xoxo from rome
    K.
    kcomekarolina.com

    ReplyDelete
  3. Zara is even too expensive for me, so I really can't think of real clothes even if I'd love to own them. For me, Zara is an inspiration for what could be "in" as well as Fashion weeks are. I check them out, get the inspiration and search for similar pieces in secondhand shops. And since most of the trends are not new because they just have a comeback, it' works perfectly. And it's cheap. If I want something unique, I can find it there or I DIY it. I don't blame Zara or H&M for kind of copying the clothes from brands - since, let's face it, most of the shops do. Designers even, as you said, have similar collections. So it's really no big deal, that's how it works.

    ReplyDelete
  4. This is a really interesting article, and I couldn't agree more with you ! Fashion shows dictate what's "in". Of course that high street brand such as Zara/H&M/Topshop and so on, copy those trends. And thanks god for that ! A sixteen years old girl can be "in" such as a forty years old woman who can afford a Stella ensemble. I think Menkes article show how "desperate" are fashion editors are in front of the internet phenomena, that kind of takes the biscuit. It's a constant debate that I think is really interesting ! I really liked your last article about it, it's really pleasant to read :) have a nice sunday xx

    ReplyDelete
  5. That is so true!! Wonderful post!! Fashion is usually cater to the super rich, I don't care for exact replicas, but Zara's own interpretation of a fashion trend is a perfect balance, everybody should be able to experience and enjoy a fashion trends without having to spend an arm and a leg for it!

    ReplyDelete
  6. Great post. :))

    www.stylemakessense.blogspot.com

    ReplyDelete
  7. Love reading your blog... All the the other blogs I follow I only tend to look at there pictures but I actually read yours haha... You have such a way with words and ur funny too keep at it gal! :D

    Love Megan

    ReplyDelete
  8. Love reading your blog... All the the other blogs I follow I only tend to look at there pictures but I actually read yours haha... You have such a way with words and ur funny too keep at it gal! :D

    Love Megan

    ReplyDelete
  9. Excellent article, very well written. It is a toughie because I like you am in the "yaynay" phase. I think there are times when highstreet do take it too far, like when a very unknown designer is ripped off and sometimes do wonder "how an earth are they getting away with it?!" it also confused me at times when designers take a stand and decide to sue, i remember a while back topshop were forced to stop selling a pair of dungarees which looked exactly like the ones chloe produced but then there are plenty more items which can continue on selling. I think subtle inspiration is alright but when it is too blatent, it's wrong and i don't like it.

    ReplyDelete
  10. I've really enjoyed reading your past few blog posts. You've definitely got an edge over any other blog I read. You bring more to the table than just outfit posts.
    Considering you're only 16 you've also got crazy talent as a writer.
    I think its great that the high street offer a compromise to a designer trend, majority of people can't afford those price tags and it would be unfair to limit fashion to people with a bigger bank balance. At the same time, however, it annoys me if I pay for something with a large price tag and find a similar item on the high street a few weeks later. I guess it's one of those things we have to take with a pinch (a shovel) of salt though..
    Thoughtsbybriley.com

    ReplyDelete
  11. Absolutely gorgeous! I love your simplistic style

    thatlibbygirl.blogspot.co.uk

    ReplyDelete
  12. Well I guess that's the biggest problem in fashion. The big designer houses make gorgeous pieces that you can only see on internet and spend days daydreaming. Then you go to Zara, try a similar piece but still stay daydreaming, because let's be honest the prices over there have been not so friendly, and then, if you're lucky, buy something sort of in that way in Primark (btw they have also raised their prices, wish they did that with the quality).

    There's a thin line between a paste-copy and taking an inspiration and sort of DIY it. Because actually you can't really make a 100% copy. Then you would have to have the same fabric, thread etc.
    I just think this whole thing is #%$^$%^#$. Trends change every other month (ok, maybe not that fast, but you get the point) and whats really the point of fashion if you can't wear it. I think the designers in a way should be proud that someone is looking up to them and taking inspiration from them, which leads others (us, mortals) also looking up to the designers, because the ones who really breathe fashion knows the real source of the design.

    ReplyDelete
  13. clutch ♥♥ numero uno

    http://franchemeetsfashion.blogspot.cz/

    ReplyDelete
  14. completely agree! While it's wrong when you see high street designers completely rip off items from high end collections, there has to be some leeway. After all, the high street does exist for a reason! Not all of us can swan about in big names, but that doesn't mean we don't want to wear the same styles we see on the catwalk. I guess it's about getting the balance right between creating something that is inspired by a designer, and totally copying a piece!


    Hannah xx

    www.raspberrykitsch.com

    ReplyDelete
  15. Interesting blog post. I feel the same 'yanay' way as you, I definitely do buy things which are similar to catwalk pieces, but at the same time feel a bit annoyed about it. I think what annoys me more is when shops copy brands like Boy London (t shirts/leggings/hats) and American Apparel (disco pants), because those brands are actually affordable to a lot of shoppers so somehow it seems more wrong!

    www.iwishicouldwink.blogspot.co.uk

    ReplyDelete
  16. While I don't really like out and out copies, I think that one of the high street's biggest strengths is the way they interpret trends and designer pieces! I agree, designers take inspiration from each other all the time (how many have jumped on the minimalist bandwagon since Phoebe Philo started at Celine?) so why can't the high street do the same? Not a fan of all this snobbiness, we all wear fashion so therefore it should be accessible to everyone I think.
    By the way, I've really been loving these kind of posts...really well written and interesting! xxx

    ReplyDelete
  17. Just found your blog and I love it!!! Looking forward to following your fashionable adventure xxx

    http://myworldbysasha.blogspot.co.uk

    ReplyDelete
  18. great blog! great post!

    http://thehandbagconcept.com/

    ReplyDelete
  19. Honestly, the fashion industry wouldn't grow and be so accesable to everyone if lower end stores like Zara do what they do. If Zara, F21, H&M.. whomever weren't allowed to "be inspired" by the runway, then there goes any kind of accessability and intrugue to the fashion industry. I don't think exact replicas are okay, but being highly inspired and offering something similar at a lower price point is awesome.

    www.StyleInterplay.com

    .....

    ReplyDelete
  20. gorgeous style, adoring your blog miss!
    would love to see you in casper&pearl one day!

    lots of love from the c&p girls,
    casper&pearl blog
    xx

    ReplyDelete
  21. Stunning clutch! My purchases from markets abroad are my prized possessions! xx

    www.satinandsouffles.com
    www.satinandsouffles.com

    ReplyDelete
  22. better than zara anyway! x

    http://frockled.blogspot.com.au/

    ReplyDelete
  23. I was having this exact discussion and nearly the same outcome about a week ago. It's a very touchy subject and there are LOT of reasons for both sides of the argument. I think that it would be difficult to NOT have things look similar in a world with so many people. I get it, everyone is a special snowflake with special snowflake ideas. But how many different ways can you make a shirt or pants or jacket, etc? There is going to be some overlap. I think I find issue when there are those who INTENTIONALLY COPY. But how do we prove intentions?

    But I agree that Zara, and H&M and Forever21 are usually targeting those with non-Celine price points and what is fashion if not everyone can participate?

    PS- I love that clutch and what little glimpse I see of your outfit, haha~

    ReplyDelete
  24. I was having the exact same conversation about a week ago. My outcome was the same. My issue was how we can know if someone's INTENTION was to steal an idea. I get it, we are all special snowflakes with special snowflake thoughts and ideas. But at some point everything overlaps and starts looking the same.
    It becomes difficult to fight for either sides when I am in the non-Celine-or-whatever price-point. What is fashion if not everyone can participate?

    PS- I love your clutch and what I see of your outfit!

    ReplyDelete
  25. I was having this exact discussion and nearly the same outcome about a week ago. It's a very touchy subject and there are LOT of reasons for both sides of the argument. I think that it would be difficult to NOT have things look similar in a world with so many people. I get it, everyone is a special snowflake with special snowflake ideas. But how many different ways can you make a shirt or pants or jacket, etc? There is going to be some overlap. I think I find issue when there are those who INTENTIONALLY COPY. But how do we prove intentions?

    But I agree that Zara, and H&M and Forever21 are usually targeting those with non-Celine price points and what is fashion if not everyone can participate?

    PS- I love that clutch and what little glimpse I see of your outfit, haha~

    ReplyDelete
  26. Good lord,
    If I were 1/8 this intelligent when I was 16, I'd be superwoman now.

    These are such interesting questions you raise - especially the DIY aspect vs. the copying. I think maybe that has to do with making a profit and with resourcefulness. It's easy to make a carbon copy of something if you've got millions of dollars and machines behind you, but if you're forced to rely on your own creativity it's a bit different.

    This has also got me interested in the difference between seeing a great outfit and wearing a great outfit. Why is "half the fun of fashion that you get to wear it"? I would agree, but I don't know why.

    Such a great blog. I'm addicted.

    -Gabrielle

    ReplyDelete

Copyright @ Camilla Ackley. Blog Design by KotrynaBassDesign